Posts Tagged ‘vse’

h1

YEEES! Video editing is becoming possible

September 14, 2008

YEEEEES!  It’s working!  Praise the Lord! Whoot!  Yahoo!

OK, onto the point:  I have successfully produced a very short video clip from a 720×480 (or was it HD SP?) mpeg2 video file into a final output of a 720×480 mpeg2!  This may sound like “So what?”, so let me explain:

Using Rob Scott’s BunnyHopHop workflow I have used Blender 2.47 to do a minor edit to a 720×480 (or was it HD SP?) mpeg2 file with proxies, exported an excerpt of the video to PNG, optimized an AVS script in AvsP, (find the AviSynth wiki here,) ran it in QuEnc to encode the video to mpeg2, and the final result was a compressed 720×480 video with a/v in sync!

See a screenshot:

Blender, AvsP, QuEnc, and VLC Player

Current video editing workflow: Blender, AvsP, QuEnc, and VLC Player

Praise the Lord!  This is a  big mile marker in my video editing journey!

Now I hope all my editing needs will be met by open source software and Blender, and that BlenderAVC will rise to meet the standards of editing HD in the open source world!

About BlenderAVC:

BlenderAVC is an open-source project to provide the “glue” between Blender’s Sequence Editor and video in the AVCHD format. It provides a way of automating the creation of AviSynth scripts and proxy files so that AVCHD and HDV video can be efficiently edited within Blender.

[from the Open Filmmaking page on BlenderAVC.]

God bless!  I look forward to the journey ahead,

Thanks a million, Rob Scott!!!

-b

P.S. The video I tested was from a number of .tod video files through CyberLink BD: PowerDirector Express and exported to mpeg2.  In future testing I may use other workflows to optimize the time spent/quality.

h1

Testing Blender VSE with HD proxy

September 11, 2008

Hey everyone!

Testing Blender’s VSE (Video Sequence Editor) for my editing needs.  So far it’s working well, once God helped me figure out how to get the audio and video the same length.  (Clue: import the audio and video separately, then make a meta strip to keep them together if you want to.)

Testing Blender VSE with HD proxy

Testing Blender VSE with HD proxy

(Watching the video real-time with a 25% proxy is great!  Unlike using Premiere Pro 1.0, playing the video back on Blender’s preview window is fast enough and sweet for viewing!)

Interlacing is bad, so I may use VirtualDub for that.  Depends.

If I can get good results from Blender, I may go with it for now and keep the JVC Everio GZ-HD7, instead of downsizing my camcorder.

Hopefully BlenderAVC will continue to be developed so I can import my video directly (without worrying about conversion.)

I hope this all works out!  Thanks to all who recommended using Blender for editing my video.  I should have tried it again earlier – then again, what’s wrong with now?  “The road goes ever one” as Bilbo sings, and it’s the journey that brings memories and experience.

Best wishes, peace out,

-b

h1

Blender green screening, VSE – and how to make your own greenscreen!

June 8, 2008

I am endeavoring to learn some of Blender’s (blender.org) VSE (Video Sequence Editor) and node compositing editor.

With the VSE you can arrange video clips and do effects, such as achieving a fade out to black (using three strips – video, gamma cross and color generator.)

Using VSE as a simple video editor may be very useful, and as it develops hopefully it will overrun such commercial monster products as Adobe Premiere Pro.  One advantage over Premiere Pro 1.0 that I have found is that Blender’s VSE accepts an .avi compression that I use, whereas Premiere Pro 1.0 doesn’t.  Besides that, Blender is completely free and open source, and is an alternative to Windows Movie Maker.  WMM can be very useful for shrinking file sizes and doing some simple editing (and you can do text effects and transitions,) but Blender’s VSE seems less dumbing.

And now about the greenscreening:

With the node compositing I am endeavoring to make a successful chroma keying – taking out a certain color, like bluescreening, also known as split screen – but it is proving quite a bit harder than I hoped. It seems (as is perfectly logical) that to have an effective keying I need very clear, pure colors to key out. Otherwise you get grays when it looks blue and your footage becomes very spotty.

Hopefully I will get some good results soon. Here’s a screenshot of my first work with chroma keying – overlaying a video on an image – not so great, but I’m learning.

Old machinery (video) on old machinery (image)

learning_compositing_and_vse_06-07-08

Also, doing further testing this evening, this chroma keying business may be much more difficult than I had hoped. Looking online for professional options, I found these two sites: (the first site recommended the second site.)

DIY (Do It Yourself – Bluescreens, Greenscreens, Backdrops and Background stands) Highly recommended to check out – you can find out about how to make your own greenscreen the cheap way. (not fool proof.

EEFX (green/blue screen backgrounds and backdrops(?)) Great for seeing professional quality equipement, seeing the prices, and learning about what makes their cloth special.

Hope you enjoy – looking forward to filming soon! Praise God!

-B